Letters To The Editor: Aug. 19, 2021

Letters to the editor.

A Day To Remember

Editor:

What a day July 2 was!  Long to be remembered, my 108th year!  I am happy everyone enjoyed it.  Thank you, everybody!

A special thank you to all who set it up!  How can I ever forget it?  The police sirens!  The clanging of the fire engines!  The wonderful food!

Juliet Bernstein
Chatham

 

Pleasantly Surprised By W. Chatham

Editor:

Before returning to Chatham in May, I asked a friend who lives close to Route 28 about the progress on the changes made in West Chatham, and he responded jokingly, “We should purchase an ambulance franchise, because they have the rotaries completed and there are going to be at least a couple of accidents there daily, once the summer traffic kicks in, that will require hospitalization, and it’s going to get even worse after the plantings go in.” I had been involved in some of the review for the planning during the time I served on the Chatham Planning Board, so this wasn’t welcome news, and my wife and I were anxious to see how the project had been realized.

Coming back and seeing the work accomplished and using Route 28 over the course of the summer, I am glad that my friend’s prediction didn’t come to pass. I have learned that, unlike previous years, there have been no accidents at the intersections where the rotaries were installed, and that the intended slowing of traffic over the stretch between them has apparently worked as intended. A left-hand turn onto 28 from George Ryder Road is no longer a harrowing experience, and we have noticed that even beyond the limits of the work on 28, drivers seem much more courteous in allowing left-hand turning movements on 28, and will stop, and blink lights or wave us ahead to turn. This is a very welcome change from former years.

The one thing that disappointed us was seeing that the town didn’t take the opportunity to eliminate phone poles in the work area and bury the overhead electric wiring. Having done so at the time of construction would have cost a fraction of what it will now cost at any time in the future and would have so much more dramatized the aesthetic improvements to the corridor.

Planting substantial street trees along both sides of the road, even though they will require pruning and maintenance, is more important than ever, because of the positive environmental effects and because it is the one device that can counter the ugliness of the legacy of leaning poles and wires. I hope that the select board can reverse their current stance on these trees.

John Haunser
Chatham

 

To Hike Among The Poetry

Editor:

If you are looking for a quick and quiet getaway, don’t miss this year’s poetry walk. A collaborative project between the Eldredge Public Library and the Chatham Conservation Foundation, it is a true gem in our town. This year the trail is Valley Farm, a level and lovely loop with views of marshland by Oyster Pond River and benches to enjoy the view. The poems that dot the trail reflect the plant life there and invite contemplation. Thank you EPL and CCF for once again providing a wonderful opportunity for us all to take a hike!

Rachel Barnes, EPL Board of Trustees
Chatham

 

Senior Center Limits COA Services

Editor:

I first went to the Chatham Council on Aging several years ago for a caregivers’ support group because I was taking care of my husband who had Alzheimer’s. As caregivers, we were able to bring our spouses who were kept busy and safe in another room during our discussions, which were led by Molly Perdue of the Alzheimer’s Family Support Services.

Prior to that experience, I was not aware of Chatham’s COA and all it offered.  During most of my many years in Chatham, I didn’t need such services.  I wasn’t elderly nor was I a widow, but that changed as the years passed.  It was very helpful to meet and spend time with other caregivers.  It’s difficult to measure the value of that time as the need for support got greater.  The comfort and support of the other caregivers in that group was a lifesaver for me.  It is easy to oppose a viable senior center until such a need arises in your family.   

As we approach our 80s and 90s, the opportunity for increased socialization becomes increasingly important.  I had hoped that a larger senior center would have supported greater participation in events, so that fewer of our citizens would have to be turned away, due to current space limitations, from the numerous opportunities the COA offers, including lunches, live music, fitness classes and lectures, to name a few.

Martha L. Stone
Chatham

 

 

Preserve W. Harwich Schoolhouse

Editor:

As a West Harwich native and current property and business owner, I am writing in support of the preservation and rehabilitation of the West Harwich Schoolhouse.

Our Captain’s Row citizens group is dedicated to the revitalization of our village through Historic Preservation. Like Harwich Center and Harwich Port, we have many historic structures that define the area.

We feel that the schoolhouse could be a meetinghouse and information center thus acting as a centerpiece for the village.

This historic building (and historic buildings in general) are of vital importance to our regional and national identity and should not be considered disposable.

Not only is it the right thing to do for our heritage, its the right thing to do for the environment. By extending a building's life cycle, the need for new building materials and the energy it takes to manufacture and transport them is reduced.

Elizabeth Williams
West Harwich


Editor:

As a West Harwich native and current property and business owner, I am writing in support of the preservation and rehabilitation of the West Harwich Schoolhouse.

Our Captain’s Row citizens group is dedicated to the revitalization of our village through Historic Preservation. Like Harwich Center and Harwich Port, we have many historic structures that define the area.

We feel that the schoolhouse could be a meetinghouse and information center thus acting as a centerpiece for the village.
This historic building (and historic buildings in general) are of vital importance to our regional and
national identity and should not be considered disposable.

Not only is it the right thing to do for our heritage, its the right thing to do for the environment. By extending a building's life cycle, the need for new building materials and the energy it takes to manufacture and transport them is reduced.

Elizabeth Williams
West Harwich

 

Rotary Rule Reminder

Editor:

The driver within the rotary always has the right of way. Pay attention to that yield sign as you cautiously approach the rotary. Yield does NOT mean:

Yelling obscenities from your vehicle while you wait to enter the rotary.

Flooring the gas to cut ahead of the driver already in the rotary( no matter how big your truck/suv).

Throwing "the bird" at other drivers due to your own impatience to enter the rotary

Driving up and over the center of the rotary (this is illegal in every country).

Stopping mid-way around due to confusion; being lost is a sign you should be in an Uber.

Stopping to politely wave someone in ahead of you is a surefire route to a fender bender. See above regarding an Uber.

Stay safe.

Wendy Gamble
South Chatham

 

Do What Town Meeting Couldn't

Editor:

Harwich Conservation Trust is doing what we, the voters of Harwich, attempted at the last town meeting. HCT wants to raise the $350,000 the town’s community preservation committee had approved in the town warrant articles. They decided the night before to disapprove without explanation.

My motion to vote on the article was overruled as “out of order” because the committee “has to approve” an article. We townspeople wanted to have our town pay for the 31-acre Jenkins bog, but were denied the right to bring this to a vote.

Hinckley's Pond Association is doing the right thing (“Pond Group Helps With Bog Purchase,” Aug. 12 Chronicle). The HPA contributed more than $40,000 toward purchase of the property. The Jenkins family wants to help us, too.

We all can support Harwich Conservation Trust to conserve and protect this critical watershed and land. Donations large and small are needed. “We’ve done it before and we can do it again, but only if everyone pitches in to protect land and water,” Michael Lach, executive director of HCT.

Sebastian Mudry
West Harwich 

A Day To Remember Editor: What a day July 2 was!  Long to be remembered, my
108th year!  I am happy everyone enjoyed it.  Thank you, everybody! A special
thank you to all who set it up!  How can I ever forget it?  The police sirens! 
The clanging of the fire engines!  The wonderful food! Juliet Bernstein Chatham
Pleasantly Surprised By W. Chatham Editor: Before returning to Chatham in May,
I asked a friend who lives close to Route 28 about the progress on the changes
made in West Chatham, and he responded jokingly, “We should purchase an ambulance
franchise, because they have the rotaries completed and there are going to
be at least a couple of accidents there daily, once the summer traffic kicks
in, that will require hospitalization, and it’s going to get even worse after
the plantings go in.” I had been involved in some of the review for the planning
during the time I served on the Chatham Planning Board, so this wasn’t welcome
news, and my wife and I were anxious to see how the project had been realized.
Coming back and seeing the work accomplished and using Route 28 over the course
of the summer, I am glad that my friend’s prediction didn’t come to pass. I
have learned that, unlike previous years, there have been no accidents at the
intersections where the rotaries were installed, and that the intended slowing
of traffic over the stretch between them has apparently worked as intended.
A left-hand turn onto 28 from George Ryder Road is no longer a harrowing experience,
and we have noticed that even beyond the limits of the work on 28, drivers
seem much more courteous in allowing left-hand turning movements on 28, and
will stop, and blink lights or wave us ahead to turn. This is a very welcome
change from former years. The one thing that disappointed us was seeing that
the town didn’t take the opportunity to eliminate phone poles in the work area
and bury the overhead electric wiring. Having done so at the time of construction
would have cost a fraction of what it will now cost at any time in the future
and would have so much more dramatized the aesthetic improvements to the corridor.
Planting substantial street trees along both sides of the road, even though
they will require pruning and maintenance, is more important than ever, because
of the positive environmental effects and because it is the one device that
can counter the ugliness of the legacy of leaning poles and wires. I hope that
the select board can reverse their current stance on these trees. John Haunser
Chatham To Hike Among The Poetry Editor: If you are looking for a quick and
quiet getaway, don’t miss this year’s poetry walk. A collaborative project
between the Eldredge Public Library and the Chatham Conservation Foundation,
it is a true gem in our town. This year the trail is Valley Farm, a level and
lovely loop with views of marshland by Oyster Pond River and benches to enjoy
the view. The poems that dot the trail reflect the plant life there and invite
contemplation. Thank you EPL and CCF for once again providing a wonderful opportunity
for us all to take a hike! Rachel Barnes, EPL Board of Trustees Chatham Senior
Center Limits COA Services Editor: I first went to the Chatham Council on Aging
several years ago for a caregivers’ support group because I was taking care
of my husband who had Alzheimer’s. As caregivers, we were able to bring our
spouses who were kept busy and safe in another room during our discussions,
which were led by Molly Perdue of the Alzheimer’s Family Support Services.
Prior to that experience, I was not aware of Chatham’s COA and all it offered. 
During most of my many years in Chatham, I didn’t need such services.  I wasn’t
elderly nor was I a widow, but that changed as the years passed.  It was very
helpful to meet and spend time with other caregivers.  It’s difficult to measure
the value of that time as the need for support got greater.  The comfort and
support of the other caregivers in that group was a lifesaver for me.  It is
easy to oppose a viable senior center until such a need arises in your family.
   As we approach our 80s and 90s, the opportunity for increased socialization
becomes increasingly important.  I had hoped that a larger senior center would
have supported greater participation in events, so that fewer of our citizens
would have to be turned away, due to current space limitations, from the numerous
opportunities the COA offers, including lunches, live music, fitness classes
and lectures, to name a few.   Martha L. Stone Chatham Preserve W. Harwich
Schoolhouse Editor: As a West Harwich native and current property and business
owner, I am writing in support of the preservation and rehabilitation of the
West Harwich Schoolhouse. Our Captain’s Row citizens group is dedicated to
the revitalization of our village through Historic Preservation. Like Harwich
Center and Harwich Port, we have many historic structures that define the area.
We feel that the schoolhouse could be a meetinghouse and information center
thus acting as a centerpiece for the village. This historic building (and historic
buildings in general) are of vital importance to our regional and national
identity and should not be considered disposable. Not only is it the right
thing to do for our heritage, its the right thing to do for the environment.
By extending a building's life cycle, the need for new building materials and
the energy it takes to manufacture and transport them is reduced. Elizabeth
Williams West Harwich Rotary Rule Reminder Editor: The driver within the rotary
always has the right of way. Pay attention to that yield sign as you cautiously
approach the rotary. Yield does NOT mean: Yelling obscenities from your vehicle
while you wait to enter the rotary. Flooring the gas to cut ahead of the driver
already in the rotary( no matter how big your truck/suv). Throwing "the bird"
at other drivers due to your own impatience to enter the rotary Driving up
and over the center of the rotary (this is illegal in every country). Stopping
mid-way around due to confusion; being lost is a sign you should be in an Uber.
Stopping to politely wave someone in ahead of you is a surefire route to a
fender bender. See above regarding an Uber. Stay safe. Wendy Gamble South Chatham
Do What Town Meeting Couldn't Editor: Harwich Conservation Trust is doing what
we, the voters of Harwich, attempted at the last town meeting. HCT wants to
raise the $350,000 the town’s community preservation committee had approved
in the town warrant articles. They decided the night before to disapprove without
explanation. My motion to vote on the article was overruled as “out of order”
because the committee “has to approve” an article. We townspeople wanted to
have our town pay for the 31-acre Jenkins bog, but were denied the right to
bring this to a vote. Hinckleys Pond Association is doing the right thing (“Pond
Group Helps With Bog Purchase,” Aug. 12 Chronicle). The HPA contributed more
than $40,000 toward purchase of the property. The Jenkins family wants to help
us, too. We all can support Harwich Conservation Trust to conserve and protect
this critical watershed and land. Donations large and small are needed. “We’ve
done it before and we can do it again, but only if everyone pitches in to protect
land and water,” Michael Lach, executive director of HCT. Sebastian Mudry West
Harwich