Letters To The Editor: June 18, 2020

Letters to the editor.

Love For The Love Caravan

Editor:

The Terraces Orleans wants to sincerely thank Rev. Wesley Williams and friends for organizing the “Love Caravan” that circled by our long term care facility on May 27. The whoop-whoop of the sirens, the honking horns, the line of decorated cars that looked as if it would never end was a sight to behold! Just awesome. We are so grateful to the Orleans and Brewster Police and Fire Departments for leading and participating in the caravan. We thank all of the wonderful friends, families, and local people who took time out of their day to decorate their cars with signs, balloons, and teddy bears. We felt the love and hope you felt ours.

Residents so enjoyed being outside to see and experience it all. Our staff were truly touched and honored. We are so grateful to be a part of this Cape Cod community. From the bottom of our hearts, we thank you for remembering us!

Mary E. Cote-Doyle
Orleans

 

We Need More Like This

Editor:

The Orpheum Cafe is a marvelous addition to our town, Chatham needs more restaurants in town and this one is a good one. We are thrilled that the board has made good use of the space below the theater with a cute restaurant serving good food and run by good folks. 

Good job to all involved in this venture!

Noreen Powell-Wood
Chatham

 

Public Lands Audit Needed

Editor:

In this difficult time it is encouraging to see how many are taking the sequestering as an opportunity to get out and spruce up their yards, plant new growth and take walks in areas and on trails previously unfamiliar or unfrequented. The photographs of major cities devoid of air pollution and being visited by wildlife have been awesome. We on the Cape are fortunate to have such beauty around us. But, we could do so much more to both protect our environment and create more opportunity to enjoy it.

As of 2008, Chatham had 472 acres of town-owned areas defined as active recreation lands and almost 1,400 acres of town-owned conservation land. While much of the recreation area is accessible to the public, there are few well-maintained trails in the conservation areas, many of which were justified and acquired by vote at town meetings for that purpose. Trails have been allowed to become overgrown with invasive plants or with poison ivy discouraging their use by all but the uninformed. Signage indicating what is allowed is haphazard and in some case confusing. As examples, there are a total of 14 signs within 50 feet at the end of Forest Beach Road where the conservation area and the parks department controlled beach merge. On the other hand, the single sign approach used by conservation to indicate what is and isn’t allowed at the Forest Beach overlook off Bay View Road is no longer there. That should be replaced and the approach used to consolidate what’s allowed by conservation should be used for parks lands as well. Anyone seeing 14 signs is likely to ignore them all and the impact is unsightly.

I am suggesting that there be an audit of public access to our valuable lands with the purpose of making more of them available to the public, providing much needed employment and allowing greater opportunities for their enjoyment out of doors, thus spreading us out for safer distancing as well.

John Sweeney
South Chatham

 

He's No Street fighting Man 

Editor:

Let me tell you about this guy Trump.  I grew up in an Italian section in Newark, N.J.  There were a few boys my age who remind me of Trump.  In my neighborhood none of us were rich but we were not poor, either.  We always had plenty to eat and every year I got a new suit for Easter.  There were a few of us who were slightly better off than the rest of us.  Their fathers had slightly better jobs so they had a little better standard of living.  For example, their fathers would buy them a new car when they were old enough to drive.

One thing these boys all shared was the idea they could do whatever they wanted without consequence.  Of course, the rest of us would never tolerate their conduct so every now and then, when these boys aggravated one of us, they would get a smack in the face.  Invariably they would run home and tell their fathers.

That's the way Trump is, but even these kids had more coglioni than Trump.

I hear from Trump supporters he is a tough guy, that he is a street fighter. Trump wouldn't last 10 minutes where I came from.

Joseph P. Caputo
Chatham

 

Wake Up To Town Treasure 

Editor:

The Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge brings a natural resource to Chatham that draws visitors from across the country. But the refuge generally seems to be poorly accepted by Chatham residents, for a variety of reasons. But, bottom line, Monomoy NWR is an under-appreciated treasure. It provides resources for outdoor recreation, including striper fishing that is world-famous, migratory bird congregations drawing visitors from around the world, and preserves a land/seascape that personifies Chatham. Wake up, Chatham, embrace this wondrous resource that is a huge asset to the town.

Brian Harrington
Plymouth

 

Thanks For Taking Care Of Seniors

Editor:

I’m writing to let people know about the outstanding job the Chatham Council on Aging is doing, continuing its mission to serve the senior population during this pandemic despite closings and distancing.

Mandi Speakman and her staff have been working tirelessly since mid March meeting the challenges of continuing as many of their programs as possible. They work with Elder Services to ensure Meals on Wheels continues with outside pickup and the Mobile Pantry is still distributing meals with curbside service. (Another shout-out goes to Hangar B for its contribution of clam chowder to these meals.)

Senior center zumba classes are currently being held live via Zoom and other recorded and online virtual programming are posted on the COA website. Computer school volunteers are available for tech support for the seniors as needed to access the programs. A cooking demonstration usually held inside the senior center is now available on “Chatham Today.” The Artful Aging classes as well as other “in-house” programs continue virtually outside of the center itself.

The outreach branch of the COA is busy handling mental health issues and increased requests for information and referrals. The staff is also fielding the many calls from loved ones of Chatham senior residents to be assured they are doing OK. There is a modified printing of the monthly FLASH in addition to the online electronic version.

Thank you, COA, for taking care of the needs of our seniors.

Paula Carroll
Chatham

 

Park Dining, Anyone?

Editor:

With the opening of Phase 2, many of our local restaurants will still struggle to survive.  The statistics for restaurants closing permanently are staggering!  So many restaurants here in Chatham do not have the space for outside dining.  Many have been doing take-out for months. We have all been encouraged to support our local eateries as much as possible. Many of us have spent our time in quarantine baking, bread, muffins etc., with flour and yeast hard to come by.  Now we are allowed to “get back” to a semi-normal of sorts.  June is here and July fast approaching. We have a beautiful park, Kate Gould Park, right in the center of Main Street, unable to be used for Friday night band concerts. Why not place a dozen or so picnic tables, and more benches for families, to be able to take their food from our local restaurants to enjoy the fine food they serve, rather than hurry home or to their rentals to eat cold food.  If you allow beaches open with “safe distancing,” why not try to help the restaurants with no outdoor seating? There certainly is enough room there at Kate Gould Park.

Suzanne Rocanello
Chatham 

 

Proud Of Harwich Marchers

Editor:

My family is so proud of the mostly young people who marched in Harwich Saturday, June 6, in support of Black Lives Matter.

The men, women and children also participated in a moment of silence for George Floyd on the green in Brooks Park.  What a great first step!

If I was a few years younger than 92, I would have joined this enthusiastic group of marchers.

Donald Mackay
Harwich 

<Headline>Love For The Love Caravan

 

Editor:

The Terraces Orleans wants to sincerely thank Rev. Wesley Williams and friends for organizing the “Love Caravan” that circled by our long term care facility on May 27. The whoop-whoop of the sirens, the honking horns, the line of decorated cars that looked as if it would never end was a sight to behold! Just awesome. We are so grateful to the Orleans and Brewster Police and Fire Departments for leading and participating in the caravan. We thank all of the wonderful friends, families, and local people who took time out of their day to decorate their cars with signs, balloons, and teddy bears. We felt the love and hope you felt ours.
Residents so enjoyed being outside to see and experience it all. Our staff were truly touched and honored. We are so grateful to be a part of this Cape Cod community. From the bottom of our hearts, we thank you for remembering us!

 

Mary E. Cote-Doyle

Orleans

 

 

<Headline>We Need More Like This

 

Editor:
The Orpheum Cafe is a marvelous addition to our town, Chatham needs more restaurants in town and this one is a good one. We are thrilled that the board has made good use of the space below the theater with a cute restaurant serving good food and run by good folks. 

Good job to all involved in this venture!

 

Noreen Powell-Wood

Chatham

 

 

<Headline>Public Lands Audit Needed

 

Editor:
In this difficult time it is encouraging to see how many are taking the sequestering as an opportunity to get out and spruce up their yards, plant new growth and take walks in areas and on trails previously unfamiliar or unfrequented. The photographs of major cities devoid of air pollution and being visited by wildlife have been awesome. We on the Cape are fortunate to have such beauty around us. But, we could do so much more to both protect our environment and create more opportunity to enjoy it.
As of 2008, Chatham had 472 acres of town-owned areas defined as active recreation lands and almost 1,400 acres of town-owned conservation land. While much of the recreation area is accessible to the public, there are few well-maintained trails in the conservation areas, many of which were justified and acquired by vote at town meetings for that purpose. Trails have been allowed to become overgrown with invasive plants or with poison ivy discouraging their use by all but the uninformed. Signage indicating what is allowed is haphazard and in some case confusing. As examples, there are a total of 14 signs within 50 feet at the end of Forest Beach Road where the conservation area and the parks department controlled beach merge. On the other hand, the single sign approach used by conservation to indicate what is and isn’t allowed at the Forest Beach overlook off Bay View Road is no longer there. That should be replaced and the approach used to consolidate what’s allowed by conservation should be used for parks lands as well. Anyone seeing 14 signs is likely to ignore them all and the impact is unsightly.
I am suggesting that there be an audit of public access to our valuable lands with the purpose of making more of them available to the public, providing much needed employment and allowing greater opportunities for their enjoyment out of doors, thus spreading us out for safer distancing as well.

John Sweeney
South Chatham

 

 

<Headline>He's No Street fighting Man

 

Editor:

Let me tell you about this guy Trump.  I grew up in an Italian section in Newark, N.J.  There were a few boys my age who remind me of Trump.  In my neighborhood none of us were rich but we were not poor, either.  We always had plenty to eat and every year I got a new suit for Easter.  There were a few of us who were slightly better off than the rest of us.  Their fathers had slightly better jobs so they had a little better standard of living.  For example, their fathers would buy them a new car when they were old enough to drive.

One thing these boys all shared was the idea they could do whatever they wanted without consequence.  Of course, the rest of us would never tolerate their conduct so every now and then, when these boys aggravated one of us, they would get a smack in the face.  Invariably they would run home and tell their fathers.

That's the way Trump is, but even these kids had more coglioni than Trump.

I hear from Trump supporters he is a tough guy, that he is a street fighter. Trump wouldn't last 10 minutes where I came from.

 

Joseph P. Caputo

Chatham

 

<Headline>Wake Up To Town Treasure

 

Editor:

The Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge brings a natural resource to Chatham that draws visitors from across the country. But the refuge generally seems to be poorly accepted by Chatham residents, for a variety of reasons. But, bottom line, Monomoy NWR is an under-appreciated treasure. It provides resources for outdoor recreation, including striper fishing that is world-famous, migratory bird congregations drawing visitors from around the world, and preserves a land/seascape that personifies Chatham. Wake up, Chatham, embrace this wondrous resource that is a huge asset to the town.

 

Brian Harrington

Plymouth

 

 

<Headline>Thanks For Taking Care Of Seniors

 

Editor:

I’m writing to let people know about the outstanding job the Chatham Council on Aging is doing, continuing its mission to serve the senior population during this pandemic despite closings and distancing.
Mandi Speakman and her staff have been working tirelessly since mid March meeting the challenges of continuing as many of their programs as possible. They work with Elder Services to ensure Meals on Wheels continues with outside pickup and the Mobile Pantry is still distributing meals with curbside service. (Another shout-out goes to Hangar B for its contribution of clam chowder to these meals.)
Senior center zumba classes are currently being held live via Zoom and other recorded and online virtual programming are posted on the COA website. Computer school volunteers are available for tech support for the seniors as needed to access the programs. A cooking demonstration usually held inside the senior center is now available on “Chatham Today.” The Artful Aging classes as well as other “in-house” programs continue virtually outside of the center itself.
The outreach branch of the COA is busy handling mental health issues and increased requests for information and referrals. The staff is also fielding the many calls from loved ones of Chatham senior residents to be assured they are doing OK. There is a modified printing of the monthly FLASH in addition to the online electronic version.
Thank you, COA, for taking care of the needs of our seniors.

Paula Carroll

Chatham

 

 

<Headline>Park Dining, Anyone?

 

Editor:

With the opening of Phase 2, many of our local restaurants will still struggle to survive. The statistics for restaurants closing permanently are staggering! So many restaurants here in Chatham do not have the space for outside dining. Many have been doing take-out for months. We have all been encouraged to support our local eateries as much as possible. Many of us have spent our time in quarantine baking, bread, muffins etc., with flour and yeast hard to come by. Now we are allowed to “get back” to a semi-normal of sorts. June is here and July fast approaching. We have a beautiful park, Kate Gould Park, right in the center of Main Street, unable to be used for Friday night band concerts. Why not place a dozen or so picnic tables, and more benches for families, to be able to take their food from our local restaurants to enjoy the fine food they serve, rather than hurry home or to their rentals to eat cold food. If you allow beaches open with “safe distancing,” why not try to help the restaurants with no outdoor seating? There certainly is enough room there at Kate Gould Park.

 

Suzanne Rocanello

Chatham

 

 

<Headline>Proud Of Harwich Marchers

 

Editor:

My family is so proud of the mostly young people who marched in Harwich Saturday, June 6, in support of Black Lives Matter.

The men, women and children also participated in a moment of silence for George Floyd on the green in Brooks Park. What a great first step!

If I was a few years younger than 92, I would have joined this enthusiastic group of marchers.

 

Donald Mackay

Harwich