Topics: Local authors

In First Novel, Graham-Pye Finds Magic In Everyday Life

By: Debra Lawless

Susanna Graham-Pye, a learning specialist at the Cape Cod Lighthouse Charter School in Harwich who also teaches creative writing, has just published her debut novel, “There Is A Season” (Hound Hill Press, 2017). “I believe there is magic in the natural world if we pay attention, and that it is a part of our stories,” Graham-Pye said in an email interview last week. “I like to think there are glimpses of that m...

Tide Comes In Again For 'Riptide' And Its Author

By: Ed Maroney

ORLEANS — Dogs love the beach, and no dog ever loved Nauset Beach more than Riptide Windjammer. The golden retriever, who lived with the Fancy family, passed away almost 40 years ago. But his legend lives on in “Riptide,” a book by Orleans author Frances Ward Weller. First out in 1990, it's back in a new edition courtesy of publisher David R. Godine. Fran and Frank Weller were seasonal visitors in Orleans...

'A Year By The Sea' Makes Its Local Debut

By: Debra Lawless

“Year by the Sea,” the long-anticipated film of Harwich resident Joan Anderson’s bestselling memoir, will open at the Chatham Orpheum Theater this Friday, May 26, with meet-and-greet reception, book signing and a Q&A with the author after the film. “I smile a lot,” Anderson said during a telephone interview last week. “It all came together beautifully in the end.” The film, shot in just 22 days in Chath...

Photographer Kim Roderiques of Chatham teamed up with a writer and an illustrator to create a children’s book with a message: You’re never too young to give back. The beautifully illustrated book “Max and Charlie Help a Hero” tells the story of a young Chatham boy, who with his newly-adopted dog, raises money to buy a wounded veteran on Nantucket a service dog. A portion of the proceeds of the book, which is f...

SOUTH CHATHAM – Author Anne D. LeClaire's first novel in 11 years begins with a line that any writer would be happy to call their own: “Every day is ordinary. Until it isn't.” It's such a good line that fellow Chatham author Bernard Cornwell asked LeClaire if he could use it. At first, she declined. But when Cornwell suggested they both dedicate the book that the line appears in to each other, she relented....

Newbery Honor Book Author To Speak At Eldredge Library

By: Debra Lawless

Here’s the thing about “Wolf Hollow,” the new novel by Lauren Wolk of Centerville: the story is so compelling that when you finish it, you’ll be thrilled to know that another novel by Wolk will soon be released. “Beyond the Bright Sea,” set in the Elizabeth Islands off Falmouth, is due out in May. “Wolf Hollow” is for ages 10 and up and was named a 2017 Newbery Honor Book and won the New England Book Award....

In Daniel Handler's view, stories with happy endings are just no fun. A prime example is the series of novels Handler wrote under the pen name Lemony Snicket. In “A Series of Unfortunate Events,” bad things happen to three orphans over and over and over again. “It's hard for me to think of a story that doesn't have a threat involved,” Handler, a Chatham summer resident, said last week in a telephone intervi...

Chatham Author Recounts The Devastation Of AIDS

By: Debra Lawless

Thirty-five years have passed since 1981, the year we all first heard of a terrible new disease: AIDS. Today, books and memoirs are being written about the early dark days of the epidemic before advances in drugs changed a diagnosis from a sure death sentence to a controllable condition. “When people write about gay history they write about Stonewall or gay marriage,” says Michael H. Ward of Chatham, author...

Publishers often send us books here at The Chronicle hoping for a review or feature story. Often, the books have little or nothing to do with the interests of the paper or our coverage area. “The Handy Boston Answer Book” is a good example; fun book but Boston is well outside our territory; I can only speculate that it arrived here because we're located in eastern Massachusetts. So when “Bad Little Children's ...

From the profits of her two children’s books about her calico cat, Annie Patches, Chatham author Marty Koblish raised $500 for the Jimmy Fund and presented the check toward cancer care and research to the family of Emily Coughlin of Chatham. Emily, now 11, will enter the sixth grade this fall. Six years ago she was diagnosed with neuroblastoma, a rare form of childhood cancer. At the age of 4, she began 18 mon...

William Shakespeare had a connection to Chatham. Sort of. That’s according to Bernard Cornwell of Chatham, the internationally best-selling author of nearly 60 novels, including the televised Sharpe series and the recent Lost Kingdom series. Cornwell, 72, spoke for 60 minutes last Sunday in the Eldredge Public Library during the annual meeting of the Chatham Historical Society. His topic was “Shakespeare’s ...

Chatham resident Elizabeth Rudnick Hessler recently published a new novel, “Pete's Dragon: The Lost Years,” a kind of prequel to Disney's 2016 remake of “Pete's Dragon,” which will be released in theaters, including the Chatham Orpheum Theater, this Friday. On Saturday, Aug. 13, Hessler will be at the Orpheum at 6 p.m. to sign copies of the new novel. We recently spoke with the author at the Lazy Lobster, whic...

Chatham summer resident Lisa Brown’s captivating “The Airport Book” (Roaring Brook Press, 2016), is a handsome, large format picture book about a family of four that goes on a trip. And the more time you spend with book's beautiful illustrations, the more they give you. One airplane’s pilot is a woman—a great message for very young girls. And then there are mysteries. What’s in the weirdly-shaped package wrapp...

Andrew “Bob” Black spent one year as a student in Chatham in the eighth grade. And back in that 1958/1959 school year, when he studied at the Eldredge Public Library, it would no doubt have been impossible for Black to conceive that about 50 years later he would return to the same library to work on his book “ John Pendleton Kennedy: Early American Novelist, Whig Statesman and Ardent Nationalist.” “While we...

Readers often wonder how novelists find ideas for their tales—for one author, her plot came to her in nature. “I was on a walk on Wellfleet's Great Island, on a path out to where the Smith Tavern once stood,” Judith Manchester of Eastham, author of “Sisters of the Stone,” recalled in an email interview. “I started thinking, ‘imagine the history this path has seen. Imagine the people who have walked it. Imagine...

Bestselling children’s book author and illustrator Brian Lies’s new book “Gator Dad” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) exudes charm from each of its scale-filled pages. “Gator Dad” tells the story of a stay-at-home alligator dad who has charge of three rambunctious young gators. Led by Dad, the group explores the world, then returns home safe and sound. Lies says “Gator Dad” reflects an era in his own life. When Lie...